Meditate-Anon (Part 2)- for the non-meditators!

Vedic meditation (or any physical or spiritual practice), while life-changing for meditators, can sometimes be a drag for the partners (and family members, friends, and colleagues) of meditators. Several weeks ago, I posted part 1 of this series- how Vedic meditators can make it easier for their family members, colleagues and friends, to be supportive of their practice. If you missed it, or want a refresher, you can read it here!

In this post, I’ve outlined what non-meditators can do to put their meditating partners, and their relationship, at ease.

For the partners/friends/family members:

Try to keep in mind that your partner is doing something to help themselves be happier and healthier.

Try to keep in mind that your partner is doing something to help themselves be happier and healthier.

1. We understand what it’s like to be skeptical of meditation. We were there too, until we found a practice that actually works for us. We’re actually not so far apart.

2. Try to keep in mind that your partner is doing something to help themselves be happier and healthier. If that is something that bothers you, or threatens you, or that you want to put an end to, try to take a second to ask yourself why (and if this concept makes you feel defensive, it’s a sign that you definitely need to ask yourself why!). If you started a new practice that makes you feel amazing (a health kick, an exercise program, gardening, etc), how would you want them to react? Supportive? Wanting the best for you? Exactly. Try to see it from their shoes.

3. If you are worried that they are going to evolve away from you, don’t fight it- join in! Meditation increases the experience of unity, which will ultimately connect you even more. Here’s a secret- every meditator wishes their partner would meditate as well, but they may be afraid to say it to you directly. Learning to meditate is a win-win-win-win-win situation. Did I mention that everybody wins?

Meditation increases the experience of unity, which will ultimately connect you even more.

Meditation increases the experience of unity, which will ultimately connect you even more.

4. We will also do our best to understand that you may not be ready to learn yet. It is a big commitment. But, try to stay open, curious, and respectful of your partner’s practice. Try to be proud of them, even if it’s not the right choice for you.

5. If you are getting frustrated with the amount of time your partner spends meditating, try not to let it fester. In a moment where the two of you are connecting, share your feelings and ask how you can work together to make it a better situation for each of you.

6. Ask questions. Find out why it means so much to them. Give them the benefit of the doubt that they have found something real and worthwhile. If you are their boss, ask how their meditation practice can benefit their performance at work (because it most definitely will!). 

Have more questions? Need advice on how to fit meditation into your personal or professional relationship? Have advice to share on how you and your partner have made it work? Please comment here, or email Jill at Jill@JillWener.com. We love hearing from you!